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^Jke J^taPf J-^reSents 




UlU Victory 



ruibliiked by the 
l^lifmovith J4i^k ScLool 

rlymouth, VVlaii. 
Volume / y/ 0- f 



^/oreujord 



Jhe publication, of this memoru book has 
broken the lona established precedent of Jhe 
J-^llarlm . Jhe chanae In pollcu was necessi- 
tated when it became evident that the cost of 
publishing an annual of the Same aualltu as 
those of precedlna uears would be prohlbltl 
Jill Vlctoru " will take the place of the u 
book until, as its name Implies, a just and 
lastlna peace Is won. 



ue. 



ear 



1942 3itl Victory Staff 1943 



Editor-in-Chief Richard Kearsley 

Literary Editor Jean Boutin 

Business Manager . . Loring Belcher 

r . . . Malcolm Chamberlain 

Assistant Business Managers J David Crawley 

[ Ralph Fortini 

Sales Promotion William Lamborghini 

Art Editor • • Naomi McNeil 

School News Editor Marion Clark 

Alumni Editor • David Briggs 

Girls' Sports Janice Knight 

Boys' Sports Joseph Tavernelli 

Rose Brigida 

Gladys Cohen 

Ruth Morton 

. . . . George Radcliffe 
. . . Robert MacDonagh 

Betty Curtin 

. . . . Phyllis Lawday 

Edwin Baker 

Walter Silva 

Candid Camera ......... Bernard Kritzmacher 

. . . Josephine Bassett 
Joyce Bassett 



Senior Features 



■s 



Senior Poems < 



Typists i 



Recognition of Underclassmen — 

The "Till Victory" staff wishes to give recognition to these 
students who were members of the "Pilgrim" staff at the begining 
of the school year. Because of the change in the type of publica- 
tion, they were unable to contribute actively to this magazine. 

Isabel Brown Barbara Carmichael 

Joan Eldridge Lillian Shaw 

Sally Beaman William MacDonald 

Nancy Bartlett Elide Benati 

Dorothy Durant Francis Nutterville 

Mary Anderson Ruth Dale 

Norma Johnson Barbara Hall 

Ernestine Mills Marillis Bittinger 

Beverly Feinberg Robert VanAmburgh 










Jn a fateful appreciation of twenty years 

or laitklul service ana advice to the 

l^ilanm stalls, we dedicate this 

first issue of Jill Uictoru " to 

(iriam ~-s4. [\avimond. 



OSioaraphica 





President 



WILLIAM LAMBORGHINI 



Jackie is a jolly good 
fellow and a tireless worker better known to his 
host of friends by various nicknames . . . Jackson, 
Jackie, Lam, Lambo. He of the light curly hair 
and blue eyes has distinguished himself in many 
ways ... as class president for three years . . . 
as a star in "Martha" ... as the man on the fly- 
ing trapeze in the "Gay Nineties Revue" ... as 
assistant business manager of "The Pilgrim" . . . 
as sales promotion manager of "Till Victory" ... as 
ten-cent-a-week collector ... as member of the 
S. A. S. Board for three years. 



Vice-president 



PAUL BREWSTER 



We have never seen Paul 
with a grouch, and, although he is silent, he ac- 
complishes much. Paul's sunny disposition and 
innate ability have combined to give him oppor- 
tunities for service ... as vice-president of the 
class for three years ... as bank teller .... as 
representative to the S. A. S. ... as a runner on 
the cross country team ... as a stage hand in 
the "Gay Nineties Revue" ... as a participant 
in an Armistice Day assembly. 

Page 6 




Secretary 



NAOMI McNEIL 




When there is work to be 
done, the first impulse is to think of capable Na- 
omi. She is a very congenial, merry companion, 
full of fun and life. McNutt is candid to the wth 
degree, sincere and generous. Naomi has held 
many positions of responsibility ... as art editor 
on the "Pilgrim" and "Till Victory" ... as Best 
Girl Citizen chosen by the senior class ... as a 
member of the S. A. S. council ... as a Junior 
Red Cross Worker ... as a participant in hockey, 
basketball, and badminton ... as senior class sec- 
retary. 




Treasurer 



GEORGE RADCLIFFE 



In spite of his modesty and 
quiet disposition George enjoys every day of the 
year, and is an incurable optimist. His ever-ready 
smile and unquenchable cheerfulness are his out- 
standing characteristics. Georgie has proved his 
worth in many ways ... as a member of the 
staff of the "Pilgrim" and "Till Victory" ... as 
a member of the basketball team ... as a mem- 
ber of the S. A. S. council ... as an efficient class 
treasurer. 



Page 7 



^Jke j^rincipal J^ peak 5 

DEPENDABLE EXPENDABLES 



A 



MILITARY LEADER is responsible 
for the care, the training, the health, 
the equipment, and the lives of his 
Mtm^A men. They are to him the material with 

^Jj ife which he must accomplish his missions. 

Every military leader knows before he goes 
A into action approximately how much it will 

^K cost, in terms of men and equipment, to 

^U- gain a given objective in a given time. Tha. 
"*" ™ is sometimes expressed in percentages and 
appears in military analyses as "probable percentage of expend- 
ables." To achieve military ends, it is necessary to make ex- 
penditures. 

Not so many months ago we Americans read with pride of 
the exploits of the PT boats which operated off the shores of Ba- 
taan in Manila Bay and Lingayen Gulf during the campaign there. 
The title of the book describing the exploits of these men is familiar 
to all of us — "We Were Expendable." No one who read of all that 
these boats and their crews went through, can escape the conclusion 
that the title could with equal justice be rewritten, "We Were 
Dependable." Any leader, military or otherwise, knows that unless 
"expendables" are dependable, the price paid for any objective 
is bound to be excessive. An expendable must above all be de- 
pendable. 

The day approaches when we are to be "expendables", when 
upon our qualities of mind and spirit, our strength of will and 
body, will depend the success or failure of our cause. Even at 
this moment we are all "expendables" with grave responsibilities 
for our own efficiency, faithfulness, determination. But, as the 
greater duty draws nearer, as the time approaches when we step 
forward to fill the places left vacant by the "expendables" of 
Bataan and Buna and "Guadal", of Casablanca, Oran, and Kas- 
serine Pass, we must be certain that it can be said of us, "They 
Are Dependable". 

Edgar J. Mongan 

Page 8 






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rfo record here of thinai they've done; 
we onlu ieeli to nai 



ii/e Some fun 



FRANCIS AGNONE 



He's not dismayed by 


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trouble : 






He looks it in the eye 


1 


•* 


And smiles at it so 




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openly 


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That it soon passes by. 


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vL 



MARY ANDERSON 

If labor is the natural 
Destiny of mankind. 

The thought would not 
dismay her; 

She likes to use he r 
mind. 



CONSTANCE 
ARMSTRONG 

With her views o n 

music 
We cannot all agree. 
Rut her prowess as an 

orator 
Anyone can see. 



LOUIS RARINT 

How strange it is that 
Louis, 

Though he's usually 
<iuite fit. 

Developed myocarditis. 
Some fair lass the cause 
of it! 



EDWIN RAKER 

Not pensive cogitation. 
Just a cursory scan 
Would suffice to prove 

the adage 
That it's clothes that 

make the man. 



Page 10 




DONALD RARBIERI 

and 
LEONARD BARRIERI 



Alike as two peas in a 
pod. we've heard — 

Trite, perhaps, but ex- 
act: 

Rut alike as Rarbieri. 
we submit. 

Would have something 
the other lacked. 



JOSEPHINE RASSETT 

We know that in sten- 
ography 

An A she often earns — 

We would we knew the 
system 

That brings such fine 
returns. 



JOYCE RASSETT 

In these hectic, w a r - 

torn days 
Girl mechanics are the 

fashion ; 
Joyce is sure to be in 

style — 
For machines she has a 

passion. 



MARY REARHOPE 

The "V. C's" we read 

devotedly 
And thirsted for some 

more; 
Can it be true we wait 
in vain 
For issue number four? 



LORING BELCHER 

No superman of won- 
drous deed 

Could, in our estima- 
tion, 

Come close to matching 
Belcher's speed 

When food's his desti- 
nation. 



FREDERIC BLISS 

With every rule that's 
ever made 

There is something e'er 
amiss, 

And Fred is our excep- 
tion to 

Ignorance is Bliss. 



MARY BONZAGNI 

Away with pomp 

And circumstance; 

Frivolities 

She eyes askance. 



ANNA BORGHESANI 

A suppressed groan or 
muffled scream 

ConlH weaken an assist- 
ant's nerves; 

But in Doctor Dyer's 
office 

She gaily and capably 
serves. 



JOAN BOUDROT 

One of the braver 
Souls is she 
Who dared to explore 
Beyond Latin III. 




JEAN BOUTIN 

Jennnie has a little Lam 
Whom all the seniors 

know ; 
And everywhere that 

Jeannie strays 
Her Lain is sure to go. 



PAUL BREWSTER 

Some think that he is 
shy, reserved. 

But not among his 
friends, 'tis said; 

If this be true, when 
girls pass by, 

Why does his face be- 
come so red? 



DAVID BRIGGS 

II matters not how cold 

the morn. 
How deep the marsh 

with mire — 
No wind or rain can 

stay him 
When the hunter's 

heart's afire. 



MARY BRIGIDA 

It may be a siblant 
buzz in class 

Or infectious giggling 
along the hall — 

When it comes to mak- 
ing her presence felt, 

"Brigit" triumphs over 
all. 



ROSE BRIGIDA 

The E for Excellence 

she has won, 
Pleasant persistence 

pays — 
As home room secretary 

she 
Has earned it in divers 

ways. 



Page 11 



HAROLD BROWN 

"Toll it to the Marines", 

we've heard, 
And that is what we'd 

like to do: 
In native land or on 

foreign strand 

We know he'll always 
be true blue. 



RUSSELL BROWN 

T hat silence e'er is 
golden 

We know is Russell's 

creed: 
But what he lacks in 

eloquence 
He produces in t h e 

deed. 



HERBERT BURNHAM 

The questioning spirit 
And potent mind 
Are in Herbert 
Well combined. 



MARY CAPOZUCCA 

Her desire to be friendly 
Is so very innate 
One can do naught 
But reciprocate. 



JANICE CAVICCHI 

We gazed at her in hor- 
ror, 

C) u r breath w o u 1 d 
scarcely come — 

Could our aesthetic or- 
ganist 

Be madly chewing gum? 




Jo c£x ? )x> €^" 



Page li 




MALCOLM 
CHAMBERLAIN 

A gentleman and a stu- 
dent. 

A combination fair — 

His manner most con- 
siderate. 

His inner humor rare. 



MARY CICERO 

When we come upon 

her suddenly. 
Sin- blinks her eyes in 

swift accord — 
Then, w hen she sees it's 

friend — nut Inc. 
A warming smile is our 

reward. 



ROBERT CINO-OLANT 

His slumber is a won- 
drous thing 

Unbroken by the bra/en 
ring 

Of clocks— which vainly 
strive 

To get him up ere 8:05. 



MARION CLARK 

Her vocal cords become 
erratic 

When "Mam" feels wild 
elation; 

For she emits neither 
giggle nor chortle — 

Just a startling combin- 
ation. 



GLADYS COHEN 

Diana - like and pur- 
poseful 

She strides through cor- 
ridors; 
Generously she labors 
For any worthy cause. 



GLORIA COSTA 

She does not become 
Unduly excited; 
Whatever goes wrong 
Is sure to be righted. 



DOROTHY COTTI 

We must give credit 
Where credit is due : 
Dispositions like hers 
Are notably few. 



HELEN COVELL 

With paint and crayon 
So adept 

That she's forever 
Busy kept. 



PRISCILLA CRAWLEY 

Tidiness of person 
And tidiness of mind 
Are within Priscilla 
Most pleasantly c o m - 
bined. 



BETTY CURTIN 

Her will to endure 
Was not overrated: 
As quatrain chairman 
She's vindicated. 




\tTCLLIAM DARSCH 

He knows no relaxation 
Until a perfect score is 

gained : 
What Malcolm did for 

the Dime-a-Week 
In Room 301 — h e ' s 

maintained. 



JEANETTE deLANCEY 

When she has a firm 

conviction 
And feels that she is 

right. 
She'll battle for it to 

the end 
That others may see the 

light. 



FRANCES DEVITT 

"Five foot two, eyes of 

blue" 
Would almost fit this 

friend : 
She may not be so tall 

as this, 
But asserts it to the end. 



BABBABA DOUGLAS 

"Please, please remem- 
ber me," 

Pleads her history 
book; 

But on that object she 
bestows 

A withering, blistering 
look. 



RICHARD DREW 

He has no taste 
For incessant labor — ■ 
The delights of inertia 
He would oft savour. 



Page IS 



ESTELLE DRIES 

There's a task to do so 

she does it 
With little ado or fuss; 
So naturally she's not 

friend : 
Among the most vocal 

of us. 



DOMINGA FERNANDES 

For her we have 
No witticism; 
Just a synonym — 
It's rhythm. 



MAURICE FERNEZ 

He's not opinionated. 

He makes no statements 
rash — 

Hut he states with ve- 
hemence 

That Dot has lots of 
dash. 



THOMAS 
ITLLEBROWN 

In history he's fairly 

laconic, 
Rut all of us agree 
That he really waxes 

eloquent 
When we talk about 

General Lee. 



RITA FILLION 

"Variety's the spice of 
life"— 

'Tis plain that's how 
she reasoned : 

For in matters of the 
heart 

Her life is quite well- 
seasoned. 



Page Ik 




JOHN FLETCHER 

Orthodox procedures 
He's inclined to spurn: 
It's how and when and 

where and whu — 
Rut man must ask to 

learn. 



PHOEBE FRATUS 

As far as the casual eye 

can see 
Phoebe is always gay — 
Rut part of her heart 

left Plymouth 
When Joseph went 

away. 



FREDERICK 
FREYERMLTH 

Some may serve who 
stand and wait, 

Rut that's not Fred- 
erick's way — 

He likes the thought of 
action. 

He's eager for ihe fray. 



MAIUORIE 
FREYERMLTH 

If Nature's been ungen- 
erous, 

!'o her shop repair — 

Many a girl will be con- 
soled 

Ily what can be done 
for her there. 



JOHN GASCOYNE 

He's always in the thick 
of things 

In classrooms or in cor- 
ridors : 

We make no charges, 
for we know 

We're subject to the 
libel laws. 



NORMAN GIFFORD 

His instincts are grega- 
rious. 

So it comes as no sur- 
prise 

To learn he knows the 
details 

Of our most secret lives. 



MARGUERITE 
GONSALVES 

You name the dance — 
she'll do it, 

Susie-Q or bunny hug — 

Her energy's prodig- 
ious, for 

She's a solid jitterbug. 



ROBERT GOVONI 

Stand up, you rookies 
Of the Flying Wolves 

band — 
Stand up, salute! 
He's your second in 

command. 



FRANKLIN 
GRISWOLD 

Whatever it is at the 
moment. 

To business he attends: 

It's evident that his 
policy 

Has paid good divi- 
dends. 



MAREL GUILD 

In things commercial 
Mabel Guild 
Is Minerva's 
Favorite child. 




SHIRLEY HANSON 

Few girls there are 
who, unabashed. 

Could lift their voice 

To name the man they'd 
proudly serve: 

I. Edgar Hoover is her 
choice. 



OLIVE HARLOW 

With Olive in conten- 
tious mood 

N'o wise man will com- 
pete ; 

In a test of wills he'Tl 
find 

She's diilicult to beat. 



ELIZABETH HART 

She and Miss Moore! 
United they stand — 
Maine is the best state 
In the land. 



MAR.IORIE 
HATHAWAY 

iVe know the explana- 
tion 

When her mood is in- 
digo; 

The army has priori- 
ties— 

So she's feeling very 
low. 



ELIZABETH HEATH 

"Buddy" to her inti- 
mates 

Is something of a trial ; 

I'hey never know just 
what she'll do — 

Hut she'll do it with a 
smile. 



Page IS 



GEORGE HEATH 

The erroneous impres- 
sion 

That at sports alone 
he's deft 

Would be banished by 
the maidens 

That this lad has left 
bereft. 



GEORGE HOLMAN 

Georgie went to Maine 

one day, 
Which was against the 

rule — 
Our principal caught up 

with him 
And kept him after 

schol. 



ALFRED HOLMES 

We've made an obser- 
vation, 

A fact which seems 
quite clear — 

That, where you find 
fair damsels. 

Our \lfred v, ill be near. 



WILLIAM HOLMES 

By deeds, not words, 
we've heard it said, 

Is the way to get ahead ; 

If this be true, we can 
but add 

Success is waiting for 
this lad. 



DOROTHY HOLT 

Blessings on thee, little 

girl. 
For doubtless you knew 

best 
When you decided that 

work in Home Ec 
Would give you an edge 

on the rest. 



Page 16 




ISABEL HINT 

Here is a girl 
With come-hither eyes: 
That she may know it 
Is our surmise. 



NICHOLAS IZZO 

His depression 
Is profound 
When history period 
Hulls around. 



JOAN JEWETT 

Our Standard Webster 
we'll discard 

For her dictionary ; 

So worded are its mean- 
ings that 

We all become quite 
merry. 



NORMA JOHNSON 

She may be frolicking 

in the gym 
Or pondering L a t i n 

nouns — 
Hut always she is most 

alert: 
Her energy knows no 

bounds. 



JOSEPH KAISEB 

We hope his trumpet's 
not a thing 

That a boy outgrows: 

But the evidence indi- 
cates 

That that's the way it 



THELMA KARLE 

Thelma stepped from 
out our ranks 

Before the Big Night 
came : 

But for pleasant mem- 
ories' sake 

We would include her 
name. 



BICHAB1) KEARSLEY 

He's so much more 

adept than we 
In use of words — but 

let that be: 
We need not be at all 

occult 
To know to fame he'll 

catapult. 



CARLETON KNIGHT 

Away from the clash 

and the clamor, 
Away from the din and 

the strife, 
He'd live in a north 

Maine cabin 
And ask no more of 

life. 



JANICE KNIGHT 

She knoAvs her naviga- 
tion — 

For she was on the 
beam 

When she led the 
hockey girls 

As captain of the team. 



MAR.IORIE KORTH 

We bet she skips her 
cereal 

Just to do her hair — 

Such an intricate coif- 
fure 

Must take minutes to 
prepare. 




A.fc4 




BERNARD 
KRITZMACHER 

Neither saint nor sin- 
ner, 

Neither sage nor dunce; 

But to know you like 
him 

You need meet him only 
once. 



WILUAM 
LAMBORGHINI 

We know the straight 
and narrow path 

Will be the one he'll 
always pick; 

For that's the road 
which one must tread 

To lead our body poli- 
tic. 



PHYLLIS LAWDAY 

Music and drama are 
her forte; 

Yet she's not priggish, 
she's the sort 

Who punctures us with 
keen-edged wit, 

And, when it's show- 
time, she's the hit. 



BABBARA LEE 

Ofttimes serious 
Sometimes gay; 
Her mood can change 
From day to day. 



PAVLINE LEONARDI 

Sincerest approbation 
Is due to her because 
She's won feminine ap- 
proval 
A n d masculine a p - 
plause. 



Page 17 



WILLIAM LINDROS 

From his tonal modu- 
lations, 

You would know, un- 
less you're deaf, 

That his vocal undula- 
tions 

All lie in the lower clef. 



ALLEN LONGHI 

Every day in Aero' 

"1'wixt Allen and Miss 
Moore 

A race is run to ascer- 
tain 

Who first can close the 
door. 



HELENE LONGHI 

Of the program called 

"Big Sister" 
She could be a faithful 

fan, 
But as yet we have not 

seen her 
Wring her hands about 

a man. 



DOROTHY LYON 

She's no Pollyanna, 
No incurable optimist — 
She looks at life and all 

its strife 
With the eye of the 

realist. 



ANN MacLEOD 

Flustered and flurried 
In the bright morning 

light 
She rushes to school 
Almost late — but not 

quite. 



Page 18 




xHrk 




PHILIP MANCHESTER 

A tall senior yearned 
To increase his knowl- 
edge. 

So he left us in Janu- 
ary 

To go to Tui'ts College. 



DAISY MARTIN 

She would not have [he 

limelight 
Even if she could — 
Outside it she can de- 
cent ly 

Do the things she 
should. 



THEODORE MARTIN 

From P.H.S. he couldn't 

bear 
To break himself away; 
And so he broke his leg 

instead 
That he might longer 

stay. 



LOUIS MATINZI 

Our puerile practices 
He's spurned; 
Life is earnest 
He has learned. 



DONALD MAYERS 

You know him by sight. 
But you haven't met? 
Yes, he's the tall blonde 
With the little brunette. 



BETSEY MeCOSH 

In studies and sports 
Among the best 
She's proved herself 
In many a test. 



ROBERT McDONAGH 

If you've trouble with 
your "Trig" 

Or "Solid" is your woe, 

Dismiss your consterna- 
tion, 

For "Mac" is sure to 
know. 



NAOMI McNEIL 

When the Fates were 
distributing talent. 

She artfully giggled and 
cooed, 

And by feminine wiles 
and blandishment 

She put them in gener- 
ous mood. 



RUTH MORTON 

If you make the right 

advance, 
She will always want 

to dance. 
If perchance you find 

this failing, 
You might try to ask 

her sailing. 



ELEANOR NICOLI 

"Nicky" has a phobia: 
Egocentric she'll never 

be- 
lli class she is laconic, 
For she abhors pub- 
licity. 




FRANCES 
NUTTERVILLE 

She lifts her voice 
In lilting song 
And tiresome tasks 
Are not so long. 



EDWARD PENN 

In pure fabrication 
We would not engage : 
He rather likes seeing 
An argument rage. 



LESTER PENNY 

A bad penny, 'tis said, 
Will always return — 
But it's for the good 

Penny 
We show our concern. 



JOSEPH PIMENTAL 

He doesn't bandy 
Words about — 
As to their value 
He's in doubt. 



BIOHARD PO 

Though diminutive in 

stature. 
Quite opposite in mind; 
For his laugh-provoking 

equal 
Would indeed be hard 

to find. 



Page 19 



VINCENT 
PROVINZANO 

He's probably the only 

man alive 
Who's glad his car's in 

pieces; 
For now it needs no gas 

or tires, 
Yet its service never 

ceases. 



MARIAN PUTNAM 

With golden hair and 

laughing eyes 
She greets us with a 

smile : 
We like her unassuming 

■ways — 
They make our days 

worth while. 



GEORGE RADCEIFFE 

Master of most high 

finance 
He may or may not be — 
Rut we know we take 

no chance 
On his integrity. 



JOSEPH RAPOZA 

Managerial ability 
We hadn't detected, 
Rut Ray's All Stars re- 
vealed 
What we hadn't sus- 
pected. 




ARTHUR R1REIRO 

For days on end we've 
moiled and toiled. 

Yet no elation do we 
feel ; 

For "Roxie" has out- 
smarted us — 

II c h a s no Achilles' 
heel. 



ALICE ROMANO 

A ticket for the cinema? 
Ice cream for dessert? 
At recess or the theatre 
We find her most alert 



BARTLETT ROWEI.I. 

He makes himself felt 
In his own quiet way: 
What profit from fan- 
fare 
And vulgar display? 



CLAIRE ROY 

Faithfully, undauntedly 
She goes her rounds 

each day ; 
Teachers' menus will go 

through 
Unless "Gassy's" in the 



ELLEN RAYMOND 

Sense and character 
Shine through 
Serious eyes 
Of brightest blue. 



Page 20 




MAGINA ROYSTON 

"Runty" may be Eng- 
lish, 

Rut she is one of us — 

And. when she leaves 
for home again. 

We'll be the first to 
fuss. 



WALTER 
ST. GEORGE 

There's a cheerful chal- 
lenge 
In his eye 
For things that after 
Schooldays lie. 



NORMA SAMPSON 

Easier far to labor 
When wages will be 
paid: 

But we are proud of 
Norma 

For her work as nurses' 
aide. 



MARIE SANCE 

Six lessons from Ma- 
dame LaZonga 

Will teach you t h e 
Latin dance: 

But all you need to cut 
a rug 

Is one lesson — a la 
Sance. 



MILDRED SCHAAL 

Mildred was once chub- 
by 

But now she's slender- 
ized; 

Waist is tiny, hips are 
nil: 

We scarce believe our 
eyes. 



KLAUS SCHIEBLER 

He gave such competi- 
tion 

Within one short school 
year 

That, had he been here 
longer, 

We'd had much worse 
to fear. 




DOROTHY SCHNEIDER 

Dottie's garrulous man- 
ner 

Causes Miss Boucher 

To issue words of warn- 
ing 

Almost every day. 



LOUIS SCHNEIDER 

We make no point about 
physique, 

We wouldn't know- 
about allure — 

But we suggest that in 
profiile 

He reminds us of Vic- 
tor Mature. 



HELEN SHERMAN 

Her pencil's busy as her 

tongue, 
Her smile is touched 

with scorn; 
Winn told. "Be quiet 

and sit still," 
Milady doodles on. 



BETTY SHURTLEFF 

Speak no ill of Carver 
U n 1 '• s s you welcome 

strife. 
For she'll defend her 

home town 
With her very life. 



DALLAS SHWOM 

Dallas has the kind of 

smile 
That travels "out of 

bounds"; 
Then up and down our 

corridors 
Her gay laughter 

sounds. 



Page 21 



WALTER SILVA 

"Inspiration." cries the 

genius, 
"Inspiration's what I 

need !" 
And, ignoring other 

proddings, 
That and that alone 

he'll heed. 



JOHN SOUZA 

Time was when John 
and his clarinet 

Were the best of 
friends, 

But we learn with real 
regret 

That a break impends. 



THEODORA TAVARES 

Although she was loathe 

to leave us, 
She had to for a while— 
Because she's with us 

once again. 
Behold our toothy 

smile! 



ARTHUR TACHE 

We'll share his satis- 
faction 

And be proud the day 
we're told 

That at the rainbow"s 
end he's found 

The coveted wings of 
gold. 



JOSEPH TAVERNELLI 

A full and satisfactory 

life 
He's led for the past 

three years : 
No task confounds or 

confuses him long 
Ere a happy solution 

appears. 




MARCIA THOMAS 

f "larming and decorous 
We know her to be. 
Doing her school tasks 
Pleasantly. 



Oft 



Page 22 




NANCY THOMAS 

> . candid as a camera 
v incy's tongue can be, 
S be it— for in her we 

find 
y.o trace of hypocrisy. 



GLORIA TRACY 

She thinks that copious 
Laughter and chatter 
\:-e good for the soul — 
May be, for that matter. 



GEORGE WAGER 

You'll never find our 
George around 

When trouble's in the 
air; 

But, where there is jo- 
cundity. 

We'll wager he'll be 
there. 



RICHARD WALL 

His serious mien does 
not result 

l-rom pondering ques- 
tions of the day; 

He's longing for the 
fields and streams 

Where he whiled happy 
hours away. 



ROBERT WEDELL 

Nero and his fiddle 

Caused a real sensa- 
tion : 

But Robert and his vio- 
lin 

Are a safer combina- 
tion. 



ALAN WEEDEN 

Should we see him ap- 
proach school 

With gleaming eye and 
hearty stride. 

In boisterous mood, lo- 
quacious — ■ 

We should be terrified. 



WILLIAM WINTER 

His nptitude for "fix- 
ing" things 

In P'ymouth High won 
him acclaim; 

But it was as a gorilla 

'Tli'i t the public learned 
his name. 




ELIZABETH YANNI 

In every class she's far 

too prone 
To forget that we're 

around ; 
Her voice is gentle — to 

the point 
Where we can't catch a 

sound. 



DORIS YOUNGMAN 

When we've reached th« 
nadir of boredom. 

When our schedule all 
patience tries. 

We seek her out — we 
are revived! 

Our spirits, like mer- 
cury, rise. 



PEGGY YOUNGMAN 

Peggy is a paragon 

With virtues one and 
all; 

Persistently she studies 
well, 

And then plays basket- 
ball. 






Page 23 



-"" 



I 



i mvv of wmi 




DEAO 



MISSING • 



WOUNDED * 




IN TRIBUTE 

Short years ago one might hare heard 
Them laugh, and smiling call absurd 
All thoughts that they would some day stand 
Entrenched in some far foreign land 
To halt aggression's ruthless ride. 

But that day came, and those who'd smiled 
Took arms, for deep within them riled 
Such names as Wake and Singapore. 
Yet none there was who feared fate's store 
If others might their rights enjoy. 

Yes, some have died, and others, too, 
That price will pay, so things they knew, 
Like Christmas feast and Sunday's prayer, 
Down through the years will still be there 
To bless the lives of those to come. 



Page 24. 



Richard Kearsley '43 



Adamo, Bruno J. 
Adamo, Silvio 
Adams, Henry C. 
Agostinho, Albert 
Alberghini, Mario 
Albertini, Albert 
Albertini, Gerald 
Allen, Wayne 
Alsheimer, Bernard 
Alves, John, Jr. 
Alves, Manuel 
Alves, Peter J. 
Amaral, Albert 
Amaral, Manuel A. 
Anderson, Crosby 
Anderson, John H. 
Anderson, Lester 
Anderson, Russell H. 
Anderson, Winslow 
Andrada, Alfonso 
Anthony, Harold 
Anthony, Richard 
Armstrong-, Barbara 
Armstrong, Douglas H. 
Armstrong, Gordon K. 
Armstrong, Robert 
Arruda, Evelyn 
Axford, Edmund 

Babini, Alfred 
Baietti, Vincent J. 
Bailey, Frank 
Bailey, Gordon L. 
Barbieri, Alexander F, 
Barbieri, Frederick A. 
Barlow, Ernest J. 
Barnes, Parker L. 
Barnes, Robert 
Barnes, Stanley 
Barufaldi, Elio 
Barufaldi. Joseph 
Bastoni, Edward 
Bastoni, Henry L. 
Bates, Maurice E. 
Beever, Howard B. 
Berardi, James 
Bergamini, Joseph L. 
Bernardo, Adelino 
Beytes, Deane A. 
Bibeau, Raymond 
Bibeau, Edward 
Birnstein, Robert 
Boccaci, Raymond A. 
Bodell, David 
B'ongiovanni, Enzo L. 
Borgatti, Warren 
Borghesani, Olindo 
Botieri, Robert 
Bouchard, Adelard, Jr. 
Boyle, James P. 
Boyle, John J. 
Bradford, Edward W. 
Bradford, John N. 
Bradford, Stanley A. 
Bradford, Warren 
Branco, Armindo S. 



Brenner, Louis 
Brewer, John 
Brewer, Joseph 
Brewster, Spencer 
Brewster, William 
Brings, LeBaron R. 3rd 
Briggs, Robert M. 
Brtto, Francisco F. 
Bridiga, Bartholomew M. 
Brigida, Gaetano 
Brigida, Guy 
Brigida, Peter A. 
Brigida, Peter 
Brigida, Vito 
Brown, Errington 
Brown, Harold 
Bryant, George 
Bumpus, Alta M. 
Bumpus, Alton 
Bumpus, Franklin K. 
Bumpus, Rupert B. 
Burgess, Allan 
Burgess, Burton A. 
Burgess, Carleton 
Burnes, Harry W., Jr. 
Butterfield, Charles 

Cadmon, Howard 
Cadorette, John W. 
Cadorette, Robert 
Cadose, James W. 
Caldera, Francis J. 
Cameron, Kenneth A. 
Campbell, Robert 
Canducci, John 
Cannucci, Joseph 
Cappanari, Louis 
Cappanari, Stephen 
Cappella, Allen 
Cappella, Fiora P. 
Cappella, Frank J. 
Cappella, John 
Cappella, Henry 
Carbone, Anthony 
Carbone, Nicholas 
Carvalho, Henry 
Cavicchi, Adolph 
Cavicchi, John 
Chandler, Harrison 
Chandler, Ralph H. 
Chapman, John 
Chapman, Sumner A. 
Cherrier, Carl W. 
Childs, Prentiss 
Cicero, John 
Clark, Roger- 
Clark, William 
Cleveland, Clarence 
Cleveland, Harry 
tCleveland, Howard L. 
Cleveland, Louis 
Cleveland, Roy R. 
Cloud, Hugh S. 
Coggeshall, Joseph H. 
Cohen, Harvey F. 
Cohen, Wilfred E. 



Collas, Theodore 
Cook, Russell E. 
Cook, Stanley 
Correa, Joseph 
Corvini, Harold F. 
Costa, Antone F., Jr. 
Costa, Antone P. 
Costa, Herbert 
Costa, Joseph W. 
Covell, Walter 
Ciistani, Albert 
Croft, Francis L. 
Crowell, Herbert 
Dallasta, Emore 
Dante, Angelo 
Darsch, Alfred A. 
Darsch, Henry 
Darsch, John A. 
Davee, Howard S. 
Davidson, Oliver 
Deacon, Frederick 
DeCarli, Harold 
DeCost, Marcel E. 
DeCost, Norman J., Jr. 
DeCost, Rita 
DeFelice, Dominick F. 
Delano, Chester K. 
Delano, William H. 
Dern, Robert L. 
DiStefano, Richard E. 
Detrani, Nicholas 
Devitt, Minot 
Diaz, Manuel 
Dickson, Charles 
Diegoli, Warren D. 
Doten, Arthur L. 
Douglas, Donald 
Douglas, Paul 
Drew, Robert 
Dunham, Louis 
Dupuis, Arthur 
Dupuis, John H. 

Eames, Andrew R. 
Eastburn, James E. 
Eastwood, Frank R. 
Edes, Francis 
Edwards, John R. 
fEmerson, Alberto C. 
Enos, Frank E. 
Enos, John J. 

Fabii, Francis 
Fabri, Roger 
Farrell, William 
Ferazzi, Alfeo 
Ferrazzi, Gabriel 
Ferreira, James L. 
Fillebrown, James A. 
Fiocchi, Alton 
Fohrder, Lawrence L. 
Fontaine, George 
Fontes, John 
Fontes, Manuel A. 
Fortini, Ameglio 
Fortini, Robert E. 

Page 25 



Franc, Samuel 
Francis, Edward 
Frances, Robert J. 
Fraser, Charles 
Fratus, Charles 
Fratus, Domonick P. 
Fratus, George 
Fratus, Joseph H. 
Freeman, Gilbert H. 
Frim, Harris 
Fry, Henry 
Fugazzi, Thomas E. 
Furtado, August 
Furtado, David 
Furtado, Joseph J. 
Furtado, Joseph P. 

Gallerani, Ruez 
Gallo, Frank 
Gallo, John 
Galvani, Amedeo H. 
Galvani, Joseph 
Garside, Ernest L. 
Garuti, Mario A. 
Garuti, Warren A. 
Gavoni, Joseph P. 
Giammarco, Telio R. 
Gianferrari, Edmund 
Gilli, Albert 
Gilman, Ellis 
Gilman, William 
Giovanetti, Aldo, Jr. 
fGiven, William H. 
Goddard, Francis 
Godfrey, Philip 
Gomes, August 
Goodwin, Francis 
Goodwin, Lawrence 
Goodwin, William F. 
Gould, Ario R. 
Gould, Horace C. 
Govoni, Antone 
Govoni, Donald L. 
Govoni, Frank 
Govoni, Gildo 
Govoni, Joseph P. 
Govoni, Vincent 
Gray, Arthur 
Grey, R. Burton, Jr. 
Green, Edward J., Jr. 
Griffin, Harrison E. 
Griswold, Burton 
Griswold, Donald 
Guidaboni, Carlo T. 
Guerra, Andrew 
Guidetti, Robert 
Gunnarson, Harry R. 
Guy, Louise 

Hadaway, Douglas 
Haigh, George F. 
Haire, Howard 
Hale, Everett L. 
Hall, Benjamin 
Hall, Edward S. 
Hall, Lawrence A. 
Page 26 



Hall, Norman 
Halunen, Theodore 
Hamilton, Robert S. 
Hammer, John F. 
Hanson, Donald J. 
Hanson, Luther A., Jr. 
Harding, Warren C. 
Harkins, John P. 
Harkins, William 
Hai-low, Charles P. 
Harlow, Dwight 
Harlow, Richard W. 
Harlow, Warren L. 
Harmon, Earl S. 
Harper, Cecil 
Harper, Gerald I. 
Hartford, Eliot H. 
Hartwell, Everett R. 
Hatch, Stuart 
Hatch, Walter 
Hathaway, Carl 
Hathaway, Edward F. 
Hathaway, George D. 
Hathawav, William C. 
Hatton, Albert C. 
Hayes, Edward 
Havward, Boyd 
Heath, Robert E. 
Hedge, Lothrop 
Hemmerly, William H. 
Henry, Winfield 
Hey, Alan 
Heywood, James E. 
Hogan, Dennis 
Hogan, Vernon 
Hollis, William 
Holmes, Cornelius K. 
Holmes, George A. 
Holmes, Howard 
Holmes, John E. 
Holmes, Robert E. 
Holmes, Roland 
Holmes, Wendell 
Hughes, Arthur 
JHughes, Donald 
Hughes, Robert 
Hunt, Walter 
Huntley, Wilfred G. 
Hussey, A. Rodman, Jr. 

Iandoli, Louis 
Ide, Louise 
Iodice, James A. 
Ingenito, Frank 

Jacobs, William 
James, Alonzo 
Janson, William N. 
Johnson, Edward 
Kellen, John 
Kelly, John 
Kendrick, Carleton 
Kirkey, Vernon 0. 
Knight, Herbert 
t'Krltzmacher, Francis 



Lafayette, Curtis A. 
Lamb, Arthur 
Lamborghini, Ralph E. 
Lancaster, Nathan 
Lanman, Everett 
Lanman, Richard 
Laurenti, Anselmo 
Laurenti, Bruno C. 
Lavoie, Willard E. 
Lavoie, Weldon J. 
Lawrence, Frank 
Leach, Winsor B. 
Lee, Robert 
Leland, James 
Lemoine, George F. 
Lenzi, Leno. 
Lenzi, Paul 
Leonardi, Ernest A. 
Leonardi, Leonidas C. 
Lima, Louis 
Links, Ernest 
Livingston, Howard 
Lodi, Theodore 
Longever, Francis 
Longhi, Harrison L. 
Longhi, James 
Lopes, Victor V. 
Lowe, Curtis 
Lowry, Emerson 
Luiz, Antonio G. 
Luiz, Gabriel 
Luiz. Joseph 
Luz, John A., Jr. 

MacBride, Herbert C. 
MacLean, Wallace 
Magee, Roderick R. 
Magee, Wilfred 
Mahler, Lawrence 
Malaguti, Fred 
Malaguti, Frank 
Malaguti, Harold 
Malaguti, James 
Malaguti, Robert 
Malaguti, William 
Mansfield, George 
Marks. Belmiro A. 
Martin. Alfred 
Martin. Bradford 
Martinelli, Alba 
Marvelli, Robert 
Matinzi, Alton J. 
Matinzi, Oliver H. 
May, Gerald 
May, Thomas R. 
Mayher, Lawrence 
Mayo, Gerald 
McAuley. Martin 
McGovern, Joseph 
McDonald, Donald 
McLean, Donald 
McLean, Sterling 
McMahon, John H. 
McMahon, Vincent P. 
McManus, George B. 
McNaught, Warren 



Medeiros, John 
Mello, Herman 
Mellor, Mason 
Merada, Charles 
Merada, James R. 
Met^alf. Thomas G. 
Metz, George C. 
Mrtz, John J. 
M : tchell, Frederick A. 
Mitchell, Harley D. 
Mitchell, Thomas 
Montali. Louis Joseph 
Moon, Frederick S. 
Moores, Webster 
Mongan, Edgar J. P. 
Morelli. Allen 
fMorelli, Harold 
Morgardo. George 
Morrey. Warren 
Morse, Nahum 
Morton, Edwin H. 
Morton, Frederick 
Morton, Louis 
Mosman. E Reynolds 
Motta, Walter 
Motto, Michael 
Mueller, Gustave A. 
Mullaney, Raymond W. 

Neal, George R. 
Nickerson, Charles 
Nickerson, Kenneth M. 
Nickerson, Wilfred C. 
Nutterville, John 

O'Connell, Phillip 
O'Fihelly. Jeremiah 
O'Keefe, Francis M. 
Ortolani, Francis C. 

Pacheco, John 
Padovani, Andrew 
Paoletti. Robert 
Parker, Robert 
Pasolini, Amelio 
Pasolini, Julius 
Paty, John W. 
Pavesi. Richard W. 
Paul, Bernard 
Pearson, Alexander 
Pearson, William 
Pease, Wilford S. 
Peccini, Angelo 
Peck, George F. J. 
Peck, Harold 
Peck, Luther 
Peck, Robert E. 
Peck, Warren G. 
Pederzani, Arthur 
Pedrini, Benato 
Pedro, Antone J. 
Perkins, Thomas M. 
Perrault, Warren 
Perry, Benjamin 
Perry, Melquezideque 
Peterson, Donald M. 
Peterson, Donald N. 



Petit, Bernard 
Petit, Milton A. 
Petrell, William E. 
Trillins. Francis H. 
Piazzi, Vincent 
Pickard, George 
Packard, Lloyd 
Pierce, Albert F.. Jr. 
Pierce, Herbert F. 
Pierson, Paul 
Pillsbury, Albert F. 
Pimental, Manuel 
Pizzotti, Alfred 
Po, Robert L. 
Po. William 
fPoirier, Albert 
Poirier, Arthur 
Poirier, Francis W. 
Poirier, Josenh M. 
Poirier, Paul E. 
Poirier, Theophane 
PoluzrJ, Louis 
Post, Albert 
Post, Leslie 
Post, Robert P. 
Povas, Albert 
Pratt, Charles E. 
Pratt, Donald L. 
Pratt, Frank C. 
Pratt, James 
Pratt, Morton S. 
Provinzano, Angelo 
Pullum, Alvin H. 
Pyle, Arthur G. 

Quintal, Charles 
Quintal, John, Jr. 

Ragazzini, Arthur J. 
Randall, George E. 
Raymond, Harold 
Ravmond, Nathaniel M. 

Jr. 
Raymond, Richard M. 
Raymond, Robert L. 
Raymond, Robert N. 
Raymond, Warren D. 
Reed, Clarence E. 
Regini, Mario 
Reis, Arthur H. 
Resnick, Robert 
Rezendes, Gerald 
Rezendes, Joseph 
Rjcardo. Mariano 
Riley, William 
Rioux, George 
Roberts, Stanley 
Roberts, Willis 
Robbins, Gilbert H. 
Rock, Robert E. 
Rogers, R. Dunham 
Rogers, Harold 
Rogers, Stanley E. 
Romano, David 
Romano, Dario 
Roncarati, Gino J. 



Roncarati, Thomas 
Ronni, Leslie 
Rossetti, Camillo 
Rossi, Edward 
Roth, Carl, Jr. 
Rowell, Bartlett 
Rowell, Fred M. 
Ruemker, Arthur 
Ruozzi, Arthur 
Ruggiero, Nicholas 
Russell, John 
Ryan, Charles C, Jr. 
Ryan, Francis C. 
Ryan, Joseph J. 

Sa, Peter 

St. George, John B. 
Sampson, George I. 
Sampson, Clifford 
Sampson, Robert 
Santerre, Romeo 
Santerre, Wilfred 
Santos, Frank J. 
Saracca, Silvio 
Sassi. Albert 
Scagliarini, Amerigo 
Scagliarini, George 
Scalabroni, John 
Scalabroni, Louis 
Schreiber, Leroy A. 
Sears, Stanley W. 
Sears, Paul W. 
Secondo, Peter 
Secondo, Ugenio 
Sgarzi, Enzo V. 
Shaw, Curtis 
Shea, Francis 
Shea, George 
Shea, William 
Sherman, Carleton B. 
Sherman, Hyman 
Sherman, Morton F. 
Sherman, Richard B. 
Shwom, Jacob 
Shwom, Sidney 
Shwom, Solomon 
Silva, Manuel R. 
Silva, Reginald 
Silvia, George M., Jr. 
Silvia, Joseph W. 
Simmons, Merle F. 
Sirricco, Anthony 
Sirrico, Francis M. 
Sitta, Alfred 
Smith, Charles W. 
Smiith, George 
Smith, Herbert L. 
Smith, John J. 
Smith, Leslie B. 
Smith, Ronald 
Smith, Russell 
Solieri, Mario 
Spurr, John 
Stanghellini, Umberto 
Stasinos, Charles 
Stein, Louis 

Page 27 



Stefani, George G. 
Strassel, Harold 
Strassel, Nicholas F. 
Strassel, Richard D. 
Strassel, William 
Strickland, Charles R. 
Strocchi, Carlo F. 
Strong, Warren P. 
Studley, Donald 
Studley, Wesley 
Sturtevant, Morton 
Sullivan, Daniel 
Sullivan, Gerald M. 
Surrey, Herbert 
Sutherland, Robert 
Swift, Alfred 
Swift, Curtis B. 
Sylvia, Joseph B. 
Sylvia, Peter R., Jr. 

Tassinari, Arrigo 
Tavares, Charles 
Tavares, Edward J. 
Tavares, Gilbert 
Tavernelli, John 
Tavernelli, Robert, Jr. 
Taylor, John W. 
Tedeschi, William A. 
Tedeschi, Robert 



Thaver, Bernice 
Tingley, Charles H. 
Tingley, Kenneth L. 
Torres, John B. 
Torri, Nello P. 
Toupin, Richard 
Tracv, Donald 
Tubbs, Richard H. 

Union, Louis T. 

Vacchino, Joseph 
Vacchino, Joseph P. 
Valanchino, Tony 
Valente, Anthony 
Valente, Manuel L. 
Valenziano, Antonio J. 
Valenziano, Peter V. 
Vickerv, William 
Volk, Robert R. 
Volta, Alfred A. 

Walker, Charles 
Wall, George A. 
Walleston, John 
Walton, Albert A. 
Walton, Oliver S. 
Ward, Edward 
Waters, Norman 
Watters, Robert 



Watterson, Harold D. 
Webbei - , Rov 
White, Alton F. 
White, George A. 
Whiting, Henry E. 
Whiting, Roger 
Whiting, Russell E. 
Wilson, Robert 
Wirzburger, Frederick 
Wollaston, Edmund 
Wood, Alice J. 
Wood, Allen B. 
Wood, Colburn 
Wood, Karleton F. 
Woolford, R. Mason 
Wyss, Carlton 

Yanni, Vincent 
Young, Earl A. 
Young, Richard J. 
Youngman, John 

Zammarchi, Libero A. 
Zacchilli, Mando 
Zaniboni, Alton E. 
Zaniboni, Fred, Jr. 



t Killed 
t Missing 

This roll is believed to be correct to May 1. 1943 



<LA55 MOmm 




Page 



csLlfe would seem dimple 
Jrf it we fen 't tor tke war: 

(/.Jut second to that 
l/i/e think we abhor — 



Teacher 

Mr. Edgar J. Mongan 
Miss Iris Albertini . . 
Mrs. Helen Bagnall . 
Miss Viola M. Boucher 
Miss Elinor Brown . 
Mrs. Margaret E. Brown 
Mrs. Beatrice E. Garvin . 

Miss Beatrice A. Hunt . . 
Miss Jeanette C. Jacques 
Miss Lydia E. Judd . . . 
Miss Elizabeth C. Kelly . 
Mr. David R. Kingman . 
Miss Katherine J. Lang . 

Miss Nellie R. Locklin . . 
Miss Dorris Moore . . . 
Mr. Theodore Packard . . 
Miss Amy M. Rafter . . . 
Mrs. Miriam A. Raymond 
Mr. Mario J. Romano . . 
Mr. Louis Rudolph . . . . 
Mr. Reginald V. T. Steeves 

Miss Alice Turner . . . . 
Mrs. Amelia B. Vincent . 
Miss Margie E. Wilber . . 



Torment 

Chiselers 

Chalk-streaked blackboards 

Sitting for a picture 

These questions 

Correcting grammatical errors 

Interruptions in class 

Spring weather, wind east, air cold, tem- 
perature 20° 

A "springless" spring day 

To answer things like this 

Salt fish 

To miss anything 

Wolves in sheep's clothing 

These people who are forever saying, 
"She gave me so-and-so for a mark." 

People who are careless, including myself 

Loud noise 

The telephone 

Foolish questions 

Confusion 

Bike riding? 

Boys ivho don't take a shower 

People who don't clean up their labora- 
tory bench when leaving 

Snotv in April 

Getting up on those cold, dark mornings 

Smart alecks 



Page 29 







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izen 



FOR seven years the National Society Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution has sponsored a Good Citizen Pilgrimage 
among students of the senior classes in high schools all over 
the country. The seniors are asked to nominate the girl member of 
the class who possesses to an outstanding degree the qualities of 
dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism. This year the 
honor has been bestowed on Naomi McNeil, who, in the opinion 
of her classmates and teachers, is the most worthy of being Best 
Girl Citizen of the Class of 1943. 

During her three years in high school, Naomi has participated 
in many activities and has lent her support to various organiza- 
tions. In her sophomore year, she was a member of the Sophomore 
Dance Committee, and did publicity and chorus work for the opera, 
"Martha". During her junior year, she was a Junior Red Cross 
assistant, a member of the "Gay Nineties Review" chorus, and 
chairman of the Invitation Committee for the Junior Promenade. 
As a senior, she became a member of the Library Staff, a Junior 
Red Cross worker, and a committee member for the Senior Dance. 
Naomi was a member of the Council of the Student Activities 
Society in her sophomore and junior years, and she served as the 
Sophomore and Junior Art Editor of "The Pilgrim" and Art Editor 
of "Till Victory". For three years she belonged to the Girls' Glee 
Club, and served as secretary of her class. Naomi was a member 
of the National Honor Society and consequently a junior member 
of the Plymouth Woman's Club. 

The Class of 1943 is proud of its Best Girl Citizen. 

Jean Boutin '43 

We hope that our readers -u ill do toito 

Our Advertisers as they 

ha r re dene by 11s. 

Page SI 







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^Jhe School Calendar 

SEPTEMBER 

Tue. 8 Today, as P. H. S. began its sixth year in the new build- 
ing, approximately 450 students made the walls re-echo 
as they renewed comradeship with their fellow students 
and made new acquaintances. 

Fri. 18 The library staff formed under the supervision of a new 
faculty member, Mr. Thomas Packard. Many of these 
students are engaged in the editing of the Library News 
Bulletin. 

Mon. 21 Several Juniors organized the Press Club under the 
guidance of Mrs. Helen Bagnall. These pupils submit 
weekly news items to the local paper. 

Tue. 22 The first assembly was directed by Theodore Martin, 
president of the S. A. S., who explained to the school 
the benefits of the ten-cent-a-week plan. This enables 
them to enjoy football, basketball games, and assemblies 
without charge. Moreover, they receive the "Pilgrim", 
their year book, gratis. According to Mr. Mario Romano, 
faculty adviser, about 400 students agreed to support 
this plan. 

Wed. 23 School banking under the direction of Miss Elizabeth 
Kelly was started today with the boys who were tellers 
last year taking charge. It is not the amount of money 
saved that is stressed, but the habit of regular saving. 

OCTOBER 

Tue. 6 Approximately fifty girls reported to Red Cross Head- 
quarters to make surgical dressings. 

Fri? 9 In an assembly in recognition of Columbus Day, Mal- 
colm Chamberlain acted in the capacity of Dr. I. Q., 
seeking answers to questions based on the life of that 
renowned explorer. 

Fri. 9 F° r the first time in P. H. S. football history the team 
journeyed to Middleboro to play on a flood-lighted grid- 
iron. Incidentally, Plymouth won. 

Tue. 13 An "In Memoriam" assembly was held today for Francis 
Kritzmacher, a P. H. S. graduate who lost his life in the 
service of his country. In the minutes of silent prayer 

Page 33 



the school also remembered Donald Hughes and Bernard 
Parker, who were on Bataan when it surrendered and 
from whom no word has been received since that fatal 
day. 

Wed. 22 A very entertaining evening was spent by all who sup- 
ported the Gym Jam, a novelty dance sponsored by the 
Senior Class. 

Mon. 26 I n commemoration of Navy Day, Richard Tubbs, who 
had just completed his basic training in the Construction 
Battalion of the Navy, addressed the student body. He 
explained the duties of a Sea Bee, and also related some 
of his own humorous experiences. 

Mon. 26 The S. A. S. sponsored the Red Cross membership drive 
under the leadership of Miss Amy Rafter, and the school 
responded wholeheartedly. 

NOVEMBER 

Mon. 9 A group of the more ambitious members instituted a 
bi-monthly school paper with Mary Bearhope as editor- 
in-chief. It operates under the name of the "Vacuum 
Cleaner", which is all that its name implies. 

Tue. 10 To celebrate Armistice Day there was an assembly led 
by Naomi McNeil with Walter Silva and Betsy McCosh 
assisting. 

Wed. 18 After many weeks spent in preparation under the di- 
Thu. 19 rection of Miss Dorris Moore, the Dramatic Club pre- 
sented an entertaining comedy, "Orchids and Oni jns". 

Tue. 24 Emeritus, Reverend Alfred Hussey. guest speaker for 
the Thanksgiving Day Assembly, was welcomed by 
Robert Van Amburgh. Rev. Hussey spoke about the 
Pilgrims and the task that we have of preserving the 
ideals that led our forefathers to come to the New World. 

DECEMBER 

Tue. 1 Mrs. Mary Carr Baker entertained and instructed the 
school with a talk on personality. The well-chosen title 
of her interesting lecture was "Know Yourself". 

Wed. 2 The S. A. S. board and council voted to alternate school 
banking and the selling of defense stamps. 

Page 3U 



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Mon. 7 It was a fitting time, on the anniversary of the first year 
of the war, for the High School to form a Victory Corps. 
Under this plan the students will enjoy, we hope, a more 
extensive physical education program, and soon several 
new courses will be open to those interested in them. 

Tue. 22 Tonight the football squad sponsored its annual dance. 
The evening will be remembered because of the debut 
of Bob Wedell's Swing Band. 

Wed. 23 The spirit of Christmas was portrayed in an assembly 
under the direction of Miss Elinor Brown and Miss 
Elizabeth Kelly. In a church setting, the student body 
became the congregation and heard a sermon and 
prayers for "Peace on earth, good will toward men". 

JANUARY 

Fri. 8 Dr. W. W. Bauer, an editor of "Hygeia," spoke to the 
student body on health. The title of his talk was "That's 
What You Think". 

Mon. 25 Three boys left for college in the middle of their senior 
year, but they will still receive their high school diplo- 
mas. They are Bartlett Rowell at Boston University, 
Malcolm Chamberlain at Bowdoin, and Phillip Man- 
chester at Tufts. 

Wed. 27 Today the annual Legion Oratorical Contest was held 
with Constance Armstrong, Helen Sherman, Edward 
Penn, and Walter Si>a participating. Robert We- 
dell had planned to take part, but because of illness 
he was unable to compete. The judges decided that Con- 
stance Armstrong delivered the best oration on the Con- 
stitution of the United States, and she will represent 
the school at Bridgewater where the district finals are 
to be held. 

FEBRUARY 

Mon. 1 Four new courses started today in navigation, radio, 
electricity, and machines. 

Mon. 1 Mr. Louis Rudolph, formerly of Braintree High School, 
commenced his duties as director of physical education 
for boys. He is succeeding Mr. John Walker, who enlisted 
in the Navy and reported for service in January. 

Page 37 



Wed. 10 The students saw their teachers lay aside their usual 
dignity in the variety show sponsored by the Teachers' 
Club. Their talents were appreciated by a capacity 
audience. 

Fri. 12 To mark Abraham Lincoln's birthday a film, "The Per- 
fect Tribute", was shown to the school. On the same 
day Naomi McNeil was awarded the honor of the Best 
Girl Citizen in the senior class. She will attend the 
D. A. R. convention in Boston, at which time the Best 
Girl Citizen in Massachusetts will be selected. 

Fri. 19 The "Pilgrim" staff met tonight and voted to discontinue 
the year book for the duration of the war. It was agreed 
to publish in its place a Senior Memory Book. 

MARCH 
Mon. 8 The High School resumed its sessions after being closed 
for two weeks. During the first week the teachers were 
busy with rationing, but the second week provided the 
regular vacation. 

Mon. 15 At a short assembly the twenty members of the Senior 
Honor Group were announced. These students have 
maintained a scholastic record of eighty-five per cent 
or higher throughout their high school career. It will 
be their responsibility to plan the Commencement Ex- 
ercises. 

Wed. 17 Eleven new members from the Senior and Junior classes 
were elected to membership in the National Honor So- 
city. These students possess a good scholastic average, 
and have given evidence of leadership, character, and 
service to the school. 

Mon. 28 Mr. Cameron Beck of the National Fireworks Company 
in Hanover was the guest speaker at an assembly today. 
Mr. George Buttner, president of the Rotary Club, in- 
troduced Mr. Beck, whose topic was "Building a Better 
Tomorrow". 

APRIL 

Wed. 7 The Woman's Club awarded first prize to Nancy Bartlett 
in a motion pictui'e poster contest held in the art classes 
under the supervision of Mrs. Margaret Brown. Norma 
Sampson and David Crawley won the second and third 
prizes. 

Page 38 



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Mon. 12 In an assembly Mr. Mongan congratulated the students 
on the success of the Red Cross War Fund Drive spon- 
sored by the S. A. S. 

Tue. 13 Mrs. Anna Kloss, supervisor of Vocational Education 
for girls in Massachusetts, talked to both Junior and 
Senior High School girls on homemaking as a career. 

Fri. 16 Many enjoyed dancing to the music of Carlo David's 
Band at the Sophomore Shindig tonight. 

Wed. 21 School opened after a one-day spring vacation. Such an 
abbreviated one was necessary in order to meet the state 
law regarding the minimum number of school days. 

Thu. 22 The Jeep Campaign was begun in an assembly led by 
Theodore Martin, President of the S. A. S. The school 
sang patriotic songs and five children from the Cornish 
and Burton Schools rendered a war bond song. William 
Lamborghini bought a one hundred dollar bond in the 
name of the Senior class, and Theodore Martin bought 
a bond of the same denomination for the S. A. S. The 
purpose is to raise nine hundred dollars within six weeks 
in order to buy a jeep. 



A WAITER'S STATUS 

How oft have I sat at a table 

And heard midst the restaurant's babel 

A customer's nervous 

Loud pounding for service — 

As if he were raised in a stable. 

Or gazed at a faultfinding mater 

Who raged at the speed of the waiter! 

Though working with fervor 

In trying to serve her, 

Yet nothing he did woidd placate her. 

I've watched a plump dowager dodder, 

Surpressing an impulse to order 

Rich chicken souffle, 

Yet I knew right away 

By her figure, Madame hadn't ought'er. 

And so you see improvement would be great 
If they had to serve who only sit and wait! 



Page 42 



Richard Kearsley '43 



^rn Jribvih 



itie 

To GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER 

humble son of nameless slave, 
What mortal tongue hopes to express 
The measure of our gratefulness? 
"Start ivhere you are, with what you have," 
Your guide, unfailing, to the grave, 
Inspired you with the power to find 
Products to which the world was blind; 
And what you had, you gave. 

Your questing eyes saiv in the sand 
Emancipation for the land: 
From lowly plants of God's own earth 
You brought the South a vast rebirth; 
The miracles you wrought will be 
Acclaimed throughout eternity. 

Joan Eldridge '44 



To GEORGE M. COHAN 

How fitting that he shoidd be born 

On Independence Day — 

This Irishman who never waved the green; 

Red, white, and blue were good enough for him. 

His cradle ivas his trouper-parents' trunks, 

His education, back-stage dressing rooms. 

Actor, dancer, playwright, wit — 

His versatility ivas unsurpassed. 

Though self-assured and brazen in his youth, 

Off-stage he was an unassuming m,an 

Who dedicated to his show-girl wife 

Three songs immortalizing "Mary". 

Then suddenly one April there ivas war: 

And with it came a crying need for song, 

A need soon filled, for many tunes appeared. 

But only one could rise above the rest, 

Survive two wars and still remain the best. 

And now though Death, the prompter, has called 

Exit, 
There's this to keep his memory ever bright, 
The surge of all America still singing 
His warning that we're coming "Over There" . 

Isabel Brown '44 



Pago. U3 



K^la$5 l/i/M and ^Jedt 



amen 



t 



WE, the Class of 1943, only now as we prepare to leave, are 
experiencing the terrible pangs of conscience which should 
have made themselves evident some time ago. Now that 
it is too late for us to prove our change of heart by exemplary con- 
duct, we can only regret that we did not do all in our power to miti- 
gate the burden of the faculty's sorrows. 

So that the teachers will remember us in a favorable light, we 
deem it expedient to leave a token of our repentance and esteem 
to each of them. We are placing our hope of salvation in the ability 
of music to soothe the savage breast, and so with one accord we lift 
our voices in sohg and bequeath to each teacher one chorus of the 
melody indicated. 




Miss Iris Albertini 

"Smile A While" 



t h 



Mrs. Helen Bagnall 

"In The Navy" 





IVIisx Viola Boucher 

•'What's Cooking?" 



JVIiss Elinor Brown 

"He's My Guy" 



Piuje /,',. 




Mrs. Margaret E. Brown 

"Calm As The Night" 





Mrs. Beatrice E. Garvin 

"The Lady In Red" 



Miss Beatrice Hunt 

"There's Music In The Air" 





Miss Jeanette C. Jacques 



'"M 



'The Last Time I Sato Paris" 



Miss Helen C. Johnson 

"Small Fry' 





Miss Lydia E. Judd 

"Please Take A Letter, Miss Brown' 



Page 45 



Miss Elizabeth C. Kelly 

"Pennies From Heaven" 





Mr. David R. Kingman 

"God Save The King" 




Miss Katherine J. Lang 

"This Is No Laughing Matter" 



Miss Nellie R. Locklin 

"I Was Seeing Nellie Home" 




Mr. Edgar J. Mongan 



'Nobody Knows The Trouble I've Seen" 





Miss Dorris Moore 

"Manhattan Serenade' 



Page U6 



Mr. Theodore Packard 

"I Came Here To Talk For John" 





Miss Amy Rafter 

"Time Was" 



Mrs. Miriam A. Raymond 
"Inspiration" 





Mr. Mario J. Romano 

"Little Curly Hair In A High Chair" 



Mr. Louis Rudolph 

"Take Me Out To The Ball Game" 





Mr. Reginald V.T. Steeves 

"Come, Josephine, In My Flying Machine" 

Page U7 







Miss Alice Turner 

"Alice Blue Gown" 



Mrs. Amelia Vincent 

"Strike Up The Band" 



Miss Margie E. Wilber 

"Margie" 

Miss Marion Bennett 

"Here Comes The Bride' 



CLASS SONG 

A pray'r, O Father, to Thy name 

Most fervently ire raise. 
Thy goodness and Thy mercy, Lord, 

With thankfidness ice praise. 

Our falt'ring footsteps on our way 

We ask that Thou will guide. 
Teach us to do Thy will alway; 

In Thee to e'er confide. 

A precious heritage have ice; 

No man can tell the worth; 
Protect, preservve, defend Thy work, 

The country of our birth. 

May freedom and eternal peace 

Be ours in years to come. 
Sing to the Lord, His splendor tell, 

And let no heart be dumb! 

Helen Ward Sherman 



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Page 54 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Front Row: Robert Brenner, Herbert Mitchell 

Second Row: Miss Turner, Betty Bearhope, Robert Livingstone 



Page 55 



HOCKEY SCORES 



(First Team) 



Plymouth versus Victor Score 

Bourne Plymouth 3-0 (here) 

Kingston Plymouth 2-0 (away) 

Kingston Plymouth 3-0 (here) 

Football Team Tie 1-1 (here) 

(Second Team) 

Bourne Tie 1-1 (here) 

Kingston Plymouth 2-0 (away) 



BASKETBALL SCORES (Girls) 



(First Team) 



Score 



Plymouth versus Victor 

Duxbury Plymouth 26-16 (away) 

Scituate Scituate 40-34 (here) 

Duxbury Plymouth 23-12 .. (here) 

Kingston Plymouth 33-23 (away) 

(Second Team) 

Duxbury Plymouth 35-6 (away) 

Scituate Plymouth 32-21 (here) 

Duxbury Plymouth 26-11 (here) 

Kingston Plymouth 16-12 (away) 



GRIDIRON SCORES 



Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 35 

Plymouth 12 

Plymouth 21 

Plymouth 12 

Plymcuth 6 

Plymouth 21 

Plymouth 



Abington 25 

Rockland 13 



Marshfield 
Middleboro 
Bridgewater 

Whitman 

Alumni 

Kingston 

Weymouth 



6 

7 
7 
7 
6 

13 



Total 



107 



Total 



84 



BASKETBALL SCORES (Boys) 



Plymouth 20 

Plymouth 41 

Plymouth 27 

Plymcuth 20 

Plymouth 32 

Plymouth 42 

Plymouth 46 

Plymouth 28 

Plymouth 47 

Plymouth 45 

Plymouth 31 

Plymouth 17 

Plymouth 34 



Middleboro 33 

Alumni 62 

Coastguard 43 

Rockland 42 

Naval Cadets 30 

Marshfield 38 

Duxbury 27 

Middleboro 31 

Marshfield 34 

Kingston 30 

Rockland 41 

Duxbury 35 

Seniors 25 



Total 



430 



Total 



471 



Plymouth 
Page 56 



TOURNAMENT 

.... 22 Stoughton 



30 



COME TAKE A BOW! 

Ruth Morton and Betty For their determination to wear caps and 
Curtin goivns. 

Paul Brewster For his personality 

Ann MacLeod For her "Well, girl!" 

Robert Cingolani .... For his basketball skill 

Edwin Baker For being a (soda) jerk 

Loring Belcher For his brilliant business mind 

The Barbieri boys .... For being able to confuse people who 

do not know who's who 

Theodore Martin .... For being "King of the Actors" 

George Heath For the astounding feat of starting his 

car every morning 

Arthur Ribeiro For his tvavy hair (?) 

Bernard Kritzmacher . . For his constant companion (which 

one?) 

Joseph Tavernelli .... For his combination of brains and brawn 

Frances Nutterville . . . For her golden voice 

Alan Weeden For his latent energy 

Marion Clark For her contagious laughter 

Allen Longhi For his lack of logic 

Carlton Knight For his firm convictions in English IV 

Herbert Burnham .... For being our perfect secretary during 

Period 1 

Robert Govoni For being Lt. Com. of the Feminine Pur- 
suit Squadron 

Gloria Costa For her "spick and span" appearance 

Gladys Cohen For the extraordinary shrinkage of her 

gym suit which is made of pre-shrunk 
material 

Football Team For being such good sports about losing 

to the girls' hockey team 

Page 57 







X 




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Pagrc 58 



In the Long Run 



You and your friends will prize the portrait 
that looks like you — your truest self, free 
from stage effects and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography that 
PURDY success has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot 
laugh at or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride pro- 
tect your photographic self by having 
PURDY make the portraits. 



• • • 

PURDY 

160 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 

Official Photographers to 
Plymouth High School Class 1943 

• • 9 

SPECIAL RATES TO P. H. S. STUDENTS 



To the Graduating Class 


of Plymouth High School: 


x t j E extend our sincere congratulations on the com- 
▼ » pletion of your school course and express our 


best wishes for your future. 


At this time, we wish to thank you for your 


loyalty to us. We trust we may merit your 


continued patronage. 


BUTTNER'S 


OF PLYMOUTH 


To the Class of 




1943 


THE SERVICE MAY NOT 




VERY BEST 
WISHES 


BE AS GOOD, BUT THE 
QUALITY IS THE SAME. 

Jack 


for a successful 




FUTURE 


PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 


GEORGE A. RAYMOND, Mgr. 




OLD COLONY and 




PLYMOUTH Theatres 





Nook Farm Dairy 




MILK 

and 
Cream 



HEALTH 
BUILDER 



- Local Milk - - 



Taste the difference from a modern dairy 



TRY OUR FLAVORED DRINKS 



CHOCOLATE • ORANGE • COFFEE 



Nook Road Plymouth 

Telephone: Plymouth 1261 



^ BUY *^Lr 

flWAR ^ 

BONOS 
~*V Buy WAR BONDS 

SURVIVAL ***** ww xxxi. x-pvxwx^k^ 

and STAMPS to 
Protect America 



The PLYMOUTH NATIONAL BAM 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Established in 1803 
Member of Federal Insurance Deposit Corporation 



BEST WISHES 

PLYMOUTH 

MACHINE AND BURNER 

CORPORATION 



Donovan & Sullivan 

Engraving Company 



PHOTO-ENGRAVERS 



470 ATLANTIC AVENUE BOSTON, MASS. 

Harbor Building Lib. 8711 



Represented by 

P. V. CARTER, Pembroke, Mass. 



BEST WISHES 



from 



Arthur L. Ellis & Co., Inc. 



Maufacturers 



"Cape Cod" Curtains 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Scudder Coal & Oil Co 



JOHN J. ALSHEIMER, Inc. 



FAMOUS READING ANTHRACITE 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



CURRIER'S 

RESTAURANT 
and ICE CREAM SHOP 

Local Dealer for 
Whitman and Kemp Products 



63 Main St. 



PLYMOUTH 



Cape 
Insurance Agency 

Insurance for Everything 
Insurable 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 
Telephone 87-R 

BANDER'S 

Plymouth's Most Popular 

SHOP FOR MISSES 

AND WOMEN 

54 Main St. PLYMOUTH 

Tel. 38 



Edes 



Manufacturing 



Co. 



SEARS FUEL CO. 

Coal — Coke — Charcoal 
Range and Fuel Oil 

Tel. 1214-W 
Lcthrop St. PLYMOUTH 

DUNLAP 

OIL SERVICE 

GULF PETROLEUM 

Service Station 
Tel. 1278 23 Sandwich St. 



FREDERIC A. BLISS 

Plumbing 

Heating 

Sheet Metal Work 

Opp. Old Colony Theatre 



BLISS HARDWARE 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Garden Tools Fertilizers 

DuPcnt Paints Norge Washers 

Locksmiths Builders' Hardware 



Telephone 825 



PLYMOUTH 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



"Plymouth's Modern Store 


for 




Men and Boys" 




Auto Supplies Bicycles 


— WE FEATURE — 




Western Auto 


Stetson Hats 




Associate Store 


Florsheim Shoes 






Clippercraft Clothes 




6 Main Street 


Arrow Shirts 






Interwoven Hose 




PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


— 0— 




(Home Owned) 


PURITAN 




C. F. FOWLER 


CLOTHING CO. 






"Home of Dependability" 




Columbia Records 


56 Main St. PLYMOUTH 





WHEN YOU ORDER 

"blue coal" 

YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE GETTING 

for 'blue coal' is the finest, free-burning 
anthracite mined . . . 

CANTONI COAL CO. 



Tel. 1233-R 



HEDGE ROAD 



Petroleum Sales and Service, Inc.. 

Agents for 
Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oib 

HEEGE ROAD PLYMOUTH 

Telephone Plymouth 1499 

PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 

PLYMOUTH 

Building Materials of All Kinds 

Telephone 237 

MITCHELL-THOMAS CO., INC. 

Furniture - Wallpaper - Paints 

66 Court Street PLYMOUTH 

• Best Wishes to the • 
GRADUATING CLASS 



Plymouth County Electric Company 

Main Street Extension PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 1300 



LINCOLN ST. SERVICE STATION 



PRIMO ZUCCHELLI 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
Telephone 79 



Pepsi-Cola 

Hits the Spot 

Weather It's Cold or 

Weather It's Hot 

Drink 
PEPSI-COLA 



PLYMOUTH 
BOTTLING WORKS, INC. 

124 Sandwich Street 
Phone 1623-W 



JIMS 
Restaurant 

Incorporated 

FINE FOODS 

Our Specialty 

7 Main Street 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Teleohone 1187-W 



Clothes for Ail Occasions 



Sport Coats 
Sport Slacks 
Sweaters 
Ties 



Suits 

White Flannels 

Shirts 



Hosiery 

MORSE & SHERMAN 



W:i. J. SHARKEY 



Court Street 



PLYMOUTH 



Mass. Registered Broker 

Member Mass. Real Est. Exchange 

Real Estator 

EDWARD C. WARNSMAN 


Best Wishes 


Real Estate and Insurance 


Tavernelli's 


65 MAIN STREET 


Barber Shop 


Tel. 140-W 140-R 
Notary Public Plymouth, Mass. 


Opposite Buick Garage 


Plymouth & Brockton 
Street Railway Co. 

Ride Our Modern 
Air-Conditioned Buses 


Compliments of 

People's Market 


Sandwich St. PLYMOUTH 


16 Market St. Plymouth 


BROCKTON 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 


CONTENTE SHOE STORE 


Intensive Training for 

Business and Government 

Service 

Send for 52nd Year Catalogue 


Shoes for 
All the Family 

Better Shoes for Less Money 


GEORGE E. BIGELOW 

226 Main St. BROCKTON 
Telephone 635 


Tel. 733-W 301 Court Street 
NORTH PLYMOUTH 


Compliments of the 




HOUSE 


VERRE'S BARBER SHOP 


WITH 
THE 

BLUE BLINDS 


3 Barbers 

Hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p. m. 


7 North St. Plymouth 


52 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

. 



BUY BONDS 

FOR VICTORY 




Drink HOODS MILK 
FOR HEALT 



GUY W. 

COOPE 



GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 



LOCATION 

Jabez Corner 

PLYMOUTH 
Telephone 258 



WILLIAM DiMARZIO 

INSURANCE 

Plymouth 440 One Court St. 

Res. 1582 Plymouth. Mass. 

J. P. McCUE, M. D. 

16 Main Street 
Tel. 57 Plymouth, Mass. 

CLOUGH'S 

The Complete Food Market 
Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 

DR. E. S. JEWETT 



Kay's Cut - Rate 

67 Main St., Corner North 

PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 

LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN 



CROWELL'S 

Furnishings 

For 

WOMEN 

and 

CHILDREN 



Phone 406 

Hours : 9 :30 to 12 :00 — 1 :30 to 5 :00 
and by Appointment 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 

Russell Bldg. Plymouth 



WOOD'S FISH MARKET 



Tel. 261 



Main St. Ext. 



SULLIVAN'S TAXI CO. 



ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 

BEAUTY SHOP 

Room 10 Buttner Building 

PLYMOUTH 



GOODING'S 

Diamonds, Watches, Silverware 

Expert Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Plymouth's Leading Jewelry Store 

for 140 years. 

4 Main St. Tel. 429 Plymouth 



GAMBINF'S 

AIR-CONDITIONED 
LUNCHEONETTE 



Tel. 372 



52 Main St. 



DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 
THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 

PLYMOUTH 



Zanello Furniture Co. 
QUALITY FURNITURE 

UPHOLSTERING — REDDING 

Norge — Gibson — Crosley Refrigerators 

Tel. 1485 84 Court St. 



MAROIS MARKET 

HOME DRESSED 
POULTRY 



Tel. 1250 



187 Court St. 



Plymouth Rock 
GROCERY 

FRESH FRUIT 
and VEGETABLES 

117 Sandwich St. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 1198 



If it's new 
you'll find it at 



GRANT'S 



THE VALUE SPOT IN PLYMOUTH 



H. P. THOMAS FRED REGGIAN1 



First National Stores 



4 North Street PLYMOUTH 



South Centre 
Market 



Tel. 1670 21 Market St. 



ENNA JETTICK SHOES LITTLE STUDENT SHOES 

FOR CHILDREN 

EDDIE'S SHOE STORE 

E. HAND, Proprietor — 18 MAIN ST. 

THE FAMILY SHOE STORE 

A-Z COMFORT SHOES A-Z COMFORT SLIPPERS 

WHITNEY SHIRTS CHAMP HATS 

PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WILLIAM CAVICCHI, Proprietor 
Telephone 341 18 Main Street 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 

Inquire About Our Special Offer on Suits for Graduation 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS CHARACTER CLOTHES 



Elmer E. Avery Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 

16 Main Street 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

M. D. COSTA - Fruit Store 

A. BONZAGNI, Prop. 

Fruit, Vegetables, Groceries 
Tel. 669 40 Court St. 

RELIEF FOR ACID STOMACH 

BISMA - REX 

Four-Action Antacid Powder 

Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas 

Soothes Stomach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

Save with Safety at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 

BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy Rexall Stores" 

Abington--No. Abington—Rockland 

"In Plymouth It's Cooper's 



Hope to Young Americans 

100% Defense Effort 
WILL WIN! 

DO YOUR PART 

BEN R. RESNICK CO. 

Tel. 698 Cor. Summer & High Sts. 

Stoddard 8C Talbot 

Insurance That Insures 

36 MAIN ST. PLYMOUTH 

Tel. 30 

Fire — Automobile — Plate Glass 

Burglary and All Other Types 

of Insurance. 




There is a reason why those con- 
templating embarking on life's most 
pleasant journey select this office for 
their wedding stationery. 



We feature the latest type styles, in either regular 
printing, raised printing or engraving. 

We will gladly show samples of our fine craftsmanship 
and quote prices. 

THE ROGERS PRINT 

Master Printers Since 1877 
20 Middle Street Tel. 165-M 



Plymouth Co-operative Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 

A. PERRY RICHARDS 
President 



Federalized 1937 

ROBERT J. TUBBS 
Vice-President — Treasurer 



WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 







OUR VICTORY.. 

you will surely need a 

cash reserve as well as 

U. S. Savings Bonds, 

so add to your 

savings account 

? ';bstantially— often. 

BUY U. S. SAVINGS BONDS FROM CURRENT INCOME 

rUYMOUTH Co-operative 
Federal Savings 




r 



AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

forttj'-four Main St, 
fili/mouth, Massachusetts. 



Dollars in the Bank 
Fight for Freedom . . 




Ii% BUY 

1WAR 



* BONDS 
STAMPS 

FOR 

SURVIVAL 



Use School Savings 

or Victory Clubs to 

Save for VICTORY 

© • • 

BUY WAR BONDS REGULARLY 




PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 
PLYMOUTH FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 



Official P. H. S. 
Class Rings 




JEWELERS 
28 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

Dr. E. Harold Donovan 



CARROLL 

Cut Rate Perfumer 

Complete Stock of Cosmetics 
and Patent Medicines 



47 Main St. 



Next to Fire Station 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
SPECIALTIES 

1 Warren Ave. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 1298-W 



DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

6 Middle Street 

Telephone 4 Plymouth, Mass. 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING — HEATING 
Paint and Hardware Supplies 

Tel. 1423 39 Court St. 

BILLY WALSH'S MARKET 

54 Court St. Tel. 1259 

The Home of 

Refrigerative Vegetables 



McLELLAN'S 

Quality Merchandise 
at Low Prices 

PLYMOUTH 



STEIN'S 
FURNITURE STORE 



Tel. 679 



291-293 Court St. 



Compliments of 
ALVES SHOE STORE 



Tel. 441 



303 Court St. 



CONVENIENT 
ECONOMICAL 

Laundry Service 
QDlft (Unlong Caunoni 

Tel. 272 Howland St. 



SHERMANS 



PLYMOUTH 



NORTH PLYMOUTH 



Town Brook 
Service Station 

Lubrication Vulcanizing 

REPAIRING 

24-Hour Service 
Telephone 820-W 



E. Cavicchi 8C Sons 



FRUIT and PRODUCE 



Tel. 1190 



296 Court St. 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 118 Years 

PAINT — HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 
HARDWARE — PLUMBING and HEATING SUPPLIES 

1 Main Street, Plymouth 
Telephone 283 

Congratulations — Class of 1943 

WALTER S. PEARSON 
Jeweler 



62 Court Street 



PLYMOUTH 



Compliments of 




« 



CONGRATULATIONS 
and SUCCESS 

from 

Mary's Beauty Shop 

17 Leyden St. Plymouth 

Tel. 1128 



WORK and SAVE 



BUY WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 



"We put new life in old shoes" 



PLYMOUTH 
SHOE HOSPITAL 



63j/ 2 Main St. Plymouth 



Best Wishes 



Colonial Diner 



FIRE 



CASUALTY 



MARINE 



WILLIAM H. FRANKS, JR. 

INSURANCE 



101 Milk Street, Boston 



For the Graduation Gift, give a 

fine WATCH or RING 

We carry a complete line of Nationally-Advertised Watches 

BULOVA, BENRUS, ELGIN, GRUEN, HAMILTON, 

WALTHAM AND LONGINE 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings, Pen and Pencil Sets, 

Overnight Cases, Tie and Collar Sets, Billfolds, Lockets, 

Crosses, Bracelets, Rosaries, Toilet Sets. 



UEW^LRYX /COMPANY 

yy / / /X/\\ \ w^ 



15 Main St. Tel. Plymouth 65 



VOLTA MUSIC SHOP 

RECORDS — SUPPLIES — SHEET MUSIC 

297 Court St. Tel. 840-W No. Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Edward A. Burnett 

Best Wishes of 

Forest Drug Store 

(Formerly Leslie's) 

22 Court St. 
Plymouth, Mass. Tel. 358 



THE VIOLIN SHOP 

of 

ROGER S. KELLEN 



Plymouth Rock 
Hardware Co. 

62 Court St. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 950 



BAILEY MOTOR SALES, INC. 



Telephone 1090 



114 Sandwich Street 



PLYMOUTH 



BUICK and PONTIAC SALES and Service 
G.M.C. TRUCK SALES and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best-equipped 

service stations in the vicinity . . . Agents for Delco 

Batteries, and United States Tires. 



Don't Forget: All of Our Repairwork is Guaranteed 



ALPHONSO'S BODY REPAIR 



BEAR WHEEL ALIGNING 



5 1 Samoset Street 
Telephone 300-W 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Alphonso Chiari 



C. PAUL 

For Your SHOES 
and REPAIRING 

Honest Values 

Dependable Service 
53 Court St. PLYMOUTH 

D. E. REID 

Wholesale 
Confectionery 

Candy is a Delicious Food 
Eat Some Every Day 

Paver Specialties 

Tel. 1081-M 5 Willard Place 



MARVELLFS 
NEWS STAND 

299 Court St. No. Plymouth 
BALBONI'S DRUG STORE 

"The Drug Store that Serves Plymouth" 
U. S. POSTAL STATION No. 2 

Prescriptions Accurately Filled 

Free Delivery 

JOSEPH BALBONI 
Registered Pharmacist 

Tel. 1251-1057 317 Court St. 

For Night Service Call 1137-R 



CUSTOM TAILORS 

CLEANSERS FURRIERS 

We operate our own Cleansing Plant on Premises. 
Same Day Service — We Call For and Deliver. 



301 Court Street 



Tel. 941 NORTH PLYMOUTH 



= ® 



Compliments of 



SHIllOm BROS. DfflUHir SDK 



SflDOUI'S 



Twwhiow (emer * 



Shows the newest in Misses and 
Women's Wear at Moderate Prices 



STEVENS the Florist 



Jfflawpra fnr all nrrasinns 



Member of the Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 



NINE COURT STREET 



Silvio Leonardi 


SIBLEY'S SHOE STORE 


PIONEER 


Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 
AIR-STEP Shoes for Women 


FOOD STORE 

: 

298 Court St. PLYMOUTH 
Telephone 53 


ROBLEE Shoes for Men 

BUSTER BROWN Shoes for 
Boys and Girls 

// It's New, It's at Sibleu's 

11 Court Street 


Mayflower Cleansers 

KOBLANTZ BROS. 

TAILORS 

Cleaning — Pressing — Repairing 

Emond Bldg. Tel. 1240 Plymouth 


LEWIS' 

DRY GOODS WALLPAPERS 
KYANIZE PAINTS 

13 Court St. PLYMOUTH 


If it's New and Smart, 
you'll find it at 

Sylvia's Millinery Shop 

(Former Location of Children's Shop) 
18 Court St. Plymouth 


DR. JOSEPH W. WILD 

DR. GEORGE S. WILD 

Optometrists 

12 Main St. Plymouth 

Tel. 658 


Compliments of 
GRAY, THE CLEANER 


CASTLE MOTORS 

DESOTO — PLYMOUTH 

Authorized Sales and Service 


• 


120 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


H. L. WEBSTER 

Watch Repairing — Engraving 

Emond Building 


LEONORE'S 

BEAUTY SALON 
46 Main St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1116-W 


WALK-OVER 1»™ E 

65 Main St. PLYMOUTH 

— o — 


Good Quality at Just Prices 

KNIFE'S 


AGENTS FOR 

Walk-Over Shoes 

Bass Moccasins Kamp Tramps 

Arnold and Stetson Shoes 

Physical Culture Shoes 

Hill and Dale Shoes 

D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 


GROCERIES MEATS 
VEGETABLES FRUITS 

298 Court St. PLYMOUTH 
Telephone 1286 



NORTHEASTERN 
UN IVERSIT Y 




College of Liberal Arts 
Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for 
the understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical 
achievement. The purpose of this program is to give the students a liberal 
and cultural education and a vocational competence which fits them to 
enter some specific type of useful employment. Admits men and women. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the prin- 
ciples of business with specialization in Accounting, Industrial Admin- 
istration, or Marketing and Advertising. Instruction is through lectures, 
solution of business problems, class discussions, motion pictures, and 
talks by business men. Admits men and women. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional 
courses in the fields of Civil, Mechanical (with Aeronautical option), 
Electrical. Chemical, and Industrial Engineering. General engineering 
courses are pursued during the freshman year; thus the students need not 
make a final decision as to the branch of engineering in which they wish 
to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. Admits men 
and women. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen, both men 
and women, in all courses, provides for a combination of practical in- 
dustrial experience with classroom instruction. Under this plan the 
students are able to earn a portion of their school expenses as well as to 
make business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Your Guidance Officer — A Friendly Career Counselor 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 

Pre-Medical. Pre-Dental. and Pre-Legal Programs Available 

FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston. Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 
I — I College of Liberal Arts 
i — I College of Business Administration 
I I College of Engineering 

Name 

Address 



I — I Pre-Medical Program 
I — 1 Pre-Dental Program 
I — I Pre-Legal Program 



H-55a